Waiting for the perfect woman picture

Added: Artis Berner - Date: 29.12.2021 16:11 - Views: 24668 - Clicks: 8764

Progestin is a form of progesteronethe hormone that plays a role in the menstrual cycle and pregnancy. Progestin is used in several birth control methods. This discusses progestin-only pills and the birth control injection. For example, if you take birth control pills, perfect use means never forgetting to take a pill.

Typical use reflects what happens in real life. Sometimes people forget to take pills. Progestin-Only Pills: With typical use, 9 in women will get pregnant during the first year of using progestin-only pills. With perfect use—meaning people never forget to take a pill and always take them at the same time every day—fewer than 1 in women will get pregnant during the first year of using progestin-only pills.

Birth Control Injection: The injection is slightly more effective than progestin-only pills. With typical use, 6 in women will get pregnant during the first year of using the injection. With perfect use—meaning people get repeat shots on time every 13 weeks—fewer than 1 in women will get pregnant during the first year of using the injection. These methods help prevent pregnancy, but they do not protect against sexually transmitted infections STIs. If you have trouble remembering pills, use an alarm or a smartphone app to remind you.

Do not skip pills for any reason.

Waiting for the perfect woman picture

The mucus in the cervix thickens, making it difficult for sperm to enter the uterus and fertilize an egg. Progestin stops ovulationbut it does not do so consistently. About 4 in 10 women who use progestin-only pills will continue to ovulate. You can start using this method for the first time at any point during your menstrual cycle.

But you and your obstetrician—gynecologist ob-gyn or other health care professional should be reasonably sure you are not pregnant. Follow these directions:. If you start taking the pills within the first 5 days after the start of your menstrual periodno additional birth control method is needed. If you start taking the pills more than 5 days after the start of your period, you need to use an additional birth control method or avoid sexual intercourse for the next 2 days. If you are switching from another form of birth control, simply stop using the other method at the same time you start the progestin-only pills.

If it has been more than 5 days since your period started, use an additional birth control method or avoid sex for the next 2 days. If you are switching from an intrauterine device IUDyou have a few options. You can wait until you have been taking the pills for at least 2 days to have the IUD removed. You can use another form of birth control or avoid sex for the 2 days before removing the IUD and starting the pills. If you miss a pill by more than 3 hours, you should take it as soon as possible and use a backup method of birth control such as condoms for the next 2 days.

Also, if you have vomiting or severe diarrhea within 3 hours after taking a pill, the progestin may not be absorbed completely by your body. Keep taking your pills but use a backup method until 2 days after your vomiting or diarrhea stops. Certain medications may interfere with the effectiveness of the progestin-only pill. These medications include. Your ob-gyn or other health care professional should ask about any medications you are taking before prescribing progestin-only pills. Progestin-only pills offer benefits beyond birth control.

For example, some women may have less bleeding or stop having periods altogether while taking these pills. This can be helpful for women who have heavy or painful periods. Unlike birth control pills that contain estrogen and progestin, progestin-only pills do not increase the risk of high blood pressure or cardiovascular disease. Also, you can take progestin-only pills even if you have certain health conditions, such as a history of deep vein thrombosis DVT or uncontrolled high blood pressure.

If you want to get pregnant, simply stop taking the pills. You can start trying to get pregnant right away. Your chances of getting pregnant are the same as for other women your age who have not used progestin-only pills. Progestin-only pills may not be a good choice for women who have certain medical conditions, such as some forms of lupus. Women who have breast cancer or who have a history of breast cancer should not take progestin-only pills. Bleeding changes are the most common side effect. Bleeding may be unpredictable. Women may have short cycles of bleeding or spotting.

Less commonly, women may have heavy bleeding or no bleeding at all. It is not clear whether these changes get better with time. Other side effects may include headaches, nausea, and breast tenderness. The birth control injection contains the hormone depot medroxyprogesterone acetate DMPA.

This hormone protects against pregnancy for 13 weeks. You need four injections a year while you are using this form of birth control. It thickens and decreases the amount of cervical mucus. This makes it difficult for sperm to enter the uterus and fertilize an egg. Injections are given by an ob-gyn or other health care professional. The first shot can be given at any time during your menstrual cycle as long as you and your ob-gyn or other health care professional are reasonably sure you are not pregnant. If you get your first shot within the first 7 days after the start of your period, no additional birth control method is needed.

If you get your first shot more than 7 days after the start of your period, you need to use an additional birth control method or avoid sex for the next 7 days. If you are switching from another form of birth control, simply stop using the other method at the same time you get your first shot. If it has been more than 7 days since your period started, use an additional birth control method or avoid sex for the next 7 days.

If you are switching from an IUD, you have a few options. You can use a barrier method such as condoms or avoid sex for 7 days before removing the IUD and getting the first shot. The injection is most effective when you get it every 13 weeks. Injections can be given up to 2 weeks late 15 weeks from the last injection. If you are more than 2 weeks late for a repeat injection, you can have it as long as you and your ob-gyn or other health care professional are reasonably sure that you are not pregnant. You should use an additional birth control method or avoid sex for the next 7 days.

You also can consider using EC. DMPA may relieve certain symptoms of sickle cell disease and seizure disorders. It may reduce the bleeding associated with uterine fibroids. And it may protect against pelvic inflammatory disease PID. Some women report weight gain while using the DMPA injection. Among women who gained weight, the average amount of weight gained was less than 5 pounds. It takes an average of 10 months to get pregnant after stopping the injection.

Waiting for the perfect woman picture

For some women, it can take longer. If you are planning a pregnancy, talk with your ob-gyn or other health care professional about when to stop using the birth control injection. DMPA may cause irregular bleeding. During the first year of use, it is common to have longer periods of bleeding or spotting. Irregular bleeding usually decreases with each injection. After the first year, about 1 in 10 women continue to have irregular bleeding.

Many women have only light bleeding or even stop all bleeding after 1 year of use. Bone loss may occur while using the birth control injection. When the injections are stopped, at least some and sometimes all of the bone that is lost is gained back.

Any bone loss that occurs is not likely to increase the risk of bone fracture now or later in life. Women who have multiple risk factors for cardiovascular disease, like smoking, older age, or diabetes mellitusmay be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease while using DMPA. This increased risk may last for some time after the method is stopped.

Women with a history of strokevascular disease, or poorly controlled high blood pressure also may be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease while using this method. Bone Loss: The gradual loss of calcium and protein from bone, making it brittle and more likely to break. Diabetes Mellitus: A condition in which the levels of sugar in the blood are too high. Egg: The female reproductive cell made in and released from the ovaries. Also called the ovum. Emergency Contraception EC : Methods that are used to prevent pregnancy after a woman has had sex without birth control, after the method has failed, or after a rape.

Endometriosis: A condition in which tissue that lines the uterus is found outside of the uterus, usually on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and other pelvic structures. Fibroids: Growths that form in the muscle of the uterus. Fibroids usually are noncancerous. High Blood Pressure: Blood pressure above the normal level. Also called hypertension. Hormone: A substance made in the body that controls the function of cells or organs.

Intrauterine Device IUD : A small device that is inserted and left inside the uterus to prevent pregnancy. Lupus: An autoimmune disorder that affects the connective tissues in the body. The disorder can cause arthritis, kidney disease, heart disease, blood disorders, and complications during pregnancy.

Also called systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE. A menstrual cycle is defined as the first day of menstrual bleeding of one cycle to the first day of menstrual bleeding of the next cycle. Progesterone: A female hormone that is made in the ovaries and prepares the lining of the uterus for pregnancy.

Waiting for the perfect woman picture

Progestin: A synthetic form of progesterone that is similar to the hormone made naturally by the body. Sexual Intercourse: The act of the penis of the male entering the vagina of the female. Sickle Cell Disease: An inherited disorder in which red blood cells have a crescent shape. The disorder causes chronic anemia and episodes of pain. Stroke: A sudden interruption of blood flow to all or part of the brain, caused by blockage or bursting of a blood vessel in the brain.

A stroke often in loss of consciousness and temporary or permanent paralysis. Uterus: A muscular organ in the female pelvis. During pregnancy, this organ holds and nourishes the fetus.

Waiting for the perfect woman picture

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Waiting for the perfect woman