Phillies fan and boyfriend for you

Added: Laquetta Totten - Date: 08.05.2022 17:21 - Views: 47461 - Clicks: 3315

In all sports, competition can get fierce, especially at the professional level. But two young baseball fans showed us this weekend that sports are really all about fun and connection first with a beautiful show of sportsmanship, kindness, and gratitude. Joshua, a young Phillies fan, happened to be sitting near the spot where Braves first baseman Freddie Freeman landed a home run in the top of the ninth. Joshua didn't quite manage to catch the ball in his glove, and it fell down into the bullpen.

When someone grabbed it and tossed it up to him, he missed that catch, too—twice. Cameras caught him and his dad in a funny exchange, as Joshua got some light, good-natured ribbing from his old man. But that wasn't the moment that really caught people's attention. Instead of keeping the home run ball for himself, Joshua took it over to a young Braves fan who was wearing a Freeman jersey and gave it to him.

After excitedly showing the prized ball to his dad, the boy went over to thank Joshua and his dad. The whole exchange was just so wholesome, encapsulating how sports can—and should—bring people together. Even though they were rooting for opposite teams, the mutual respect and sportsmanship shown by these two boys is a lesson for all of us. People loved seeing all of this play out on film, including the Phillies and Braves themselves.

In fact, Freddie Freeman surprised Johsua before the following night's game by personally giving him a baseball ed by him and Phillies right fielder Bryce Harper. Many commenters remarked that Joshua's father is clearly raising his son right, as is the dad of the kid who came over to say think you. Joshua's dad, James Scott, said that the action of his son was in "the DNA" of the family—to "pay it forward in love," as he wrote on Twitter. He referred to the exchange as "a great moment of humanity. When we are immersed daily in stories of division, and as humanity works through the very real issues of all kinds that we have to fix to get past those divisions, it's wonderful to be reminded of the beautiful ways people can touch one another's lives in ways big and small.

In this case, a mutual love of baseball, despite the on-field rivalry of the two teams, and the basic act of a kid brightening a stranger's day reassure us that the ills of society are not all that we are. It's so easy to focus on the negative news, and it's so easy to get bogged down by the vast amount of work to be done to help us get to a place of true unity, equality, and justice.

Seeing these small moments, these seemingly minor gestures, these glimpses of human connection help sustain us through that work. It may have been a simple act, but the impact of it is profound. Thanks to these gentlemen for filling our hearts for a moment and reminding us what the best of us look like. Anthony Sampson has understood the value of mentorship since he was a young man.

Growing up in Houston, he had a mentor who helped him see the importance of volunteering and giving back to his community. By the time he graduated from college and settled in Dallas, he knew he wanted to share some of that wisdom and experience with the next generation. The organization matches Black male mentors with mostly young Black men to help them live up to their potential and contribute to society.

By building character and producing leaders, Black Men works toward improving the whole community. According to Sampson, strong mentorship can help young people develop the skills they need "to understand how to deal with issues in life from a positive perspective. Kynsington Hobbs is one of them. Now a senior in high school, Hobbs began a mentorship with Anthony Sampson when he was He says working with Sampson changed his perspective of what success can look like in the African-American community, especially for kids who don't have d in the picture. Hobbs says attending a Black Men conference several years ago helped him truly understand the organization's motto.

Jackson Session describes his mentorship with Anthony Sampson with similar enthusiasm. Session first connected with Black Men his junior year of high school when a school counselor recommended he the organization's trivia bowl team. He began attending Saturday leadership meetings with Sampson, and eventually asked if he could intern in his Allstate office.

Sampson hadn't hired a mentee before, but he took a chance. Courtesy of Anthony Sampson. Session credits Sampson with teaching him to present himself professionally and with helping him get a scholarship from the national Black Men of America organization.

Sampson is one example of thousands of Allstate agents and employees making a difference in their communities. In addition to supporting agent and employee volunteerism, for almost 70 years, Allstate has supported communities through The Allstate Foundation, which partners with leading organizations and local nonprofits to address some of the most pressing issues facing society.

The Foundation's efforts include empowering youth, breaking the cycle of domestic violence and supporting non-profit leaders, with an overarching purpose of advancing equity. This Fall, in time for back-to-school season, The Allstate Foundation teamed up with education crowdfunding platform DonorsChoose to launch a new Racial Justice and Representation category on the site, making it easy for donors to help fund teacher's classroom projects focused on increasing diversity in curricula and creating a more inclusive environment.

From buying books written by diverse authors to providing materials for anti-racism education, donors can directly support teachers working toward racial equity. These funds support teachers who — like Sampson — are serving as positive mentors helping students succeed.

To support classroom projects that promote racial equity, go to DonorsChoose.

Phillies fan and boyfriend for you

One of the most humane trends in the past 30 years of American life has been the decline in greyhound racing. After hitting its peak instate laws have led to the closure of racetracks across the country. By the end ofthere will only be two active greyhound tracks in the United States, both in West Virginia. The change in attitudes toward dog racing has meant an increase in greyhounds being rescued and living second lives as family pets. Greyhounds are great around children, have happy dispositions and, even though they're fast on the track, they don't require a lot of exercise.

Occupational therapist Taylor Huerta adopted a greyhound named Millie in and the pair has become quite the hit on social media. Huerta has a bachelor's degree in psychology and a doctoral degree in occupational therapy. After adopting Millie, Huerta realized that her dog was anxious so she put on her therapist's hat and began learning all she could about dog psychology. It became my passion to educate myself on [the subject], and through many hours of research, I gained a better understanding of Millie," Huerta explained.

She began posting videos on social media to help bridge the gap between humans and their fur babies. Heurta calls Millie a "noodle horse" because of her equine-looking features and spindly limbs that contort themselves into impossible shapes.

The result is a series of super-cute videos featuring Millie that are so popular, the MillieTheNoodleHorse TikTok has more than 1. Here's a selection of some of the cutest and most informative videos that'll teach you a bit more about your four-legged friend. Huerta and Millie are doing an incredible job of making dog psychology fun and informative. Their TikTok is a great way to help spread awareness about our incredibly adorable, yet complex, four-legged friends.

The better we understand one another the more wonderful and fulfilling our relationships will be. As a kid, Jamel Holmes knew he wanted to be a teacher. He would spend rainy days giving spelling tests and playing math games with other children in his apartment building in New York's South Bronx. But throughout elementary school, Holmes never had a teacher who looked like him. It wasn't until seventh grade that he had his first Black male teacher—Mr. In some ways, he was lucky.

Phillies fan and boyfriend for you

Teachers of color make a difference, which is why education nonprofit DonorsChoose has teamed up with The Allstate Foundation to support them. An analysis published in Education Next also found that Black teachers tend to have higher expectations of Black students, which contributes to greater success. Diversity in teaching helps white students, too. Educational laboratory REL Northwest found that white students with non-white teachers develop better problem-solving and critical thinking skills, expand their range of creativity and social and emotional skills, and increase their sense of civic engagement.

A t initiative from DonorsChoose and The Allstate Foundation offers individuals and groups opportunities to help bridge racial gaps in the classroom. For one, The Allstate Foundation will match all donations to teachers of color who are using DonorsChoose to crowdfund projects for the first time.

DonorsChoose has also partnered with The Allstate Foundation to launch a Racial Justice and Representation category on the site, making it easy for donors to help fund classroom projects focused on increasing diversity in curricula and creating a more inclusive environment. By creating this new category on DonorsChoose, we want to support these students and give voice to their teachers, tapping their frontline wisdom.

You can see those projects here. Jamel Holmes did grow up to become a teacher. He earned a master's degree and now teaches special education for sixth graders at East Bronx Academy for the Future, the same school he attended. Holmes uses DonorsChoose to help his students get what they need both inside and outside school.

He has crowdfunded technology tools for his classroom as well as personal care items for his students. He drives through the Bronx to give school supplies, clothing, laundry essentials and food to kids whose families are in need, and even takes students to get free haircuts. He wants to be a role model students can turn to. Courtesy of Jamel Holmes.

Phillies fan and boyfriend for you

Schools are charged with providing a safe, nurturing and equitable environment for students and teachers. Supporting educators who are trying to create that environment by helping fund their racial equity projects is a good place to start.

Usually when we think of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, we picture kids getting to meet Batman, or going to Disneyland, even having a well-deserved shopping spree. Thirteen-year-old Abraham Olagbegi, who was born with a rare blood disorder requiring a bone marrow transplant, could have asked for anything from the nonprofit organization.

Much to everyone's surprise, Abraham wished for a way to feed the homeless in his neighborhood. Abraham's mother, Miriam Olagbegi, was a bit shocked at the suggestion.

Phillies fan and boyfriend for you

She asked her son, "you sure you don't want a PlayStation? Miriam told CBS News that Abraham shared this unconventional idea coming home from one of his doctor's appointments. Their family used to feed the homeless every month before Abraham's diagnosis. And apparently that monthly outing had a profound effect. I can't imagine how satisfying it must have been for Abraham's parents, who actively taught the value of giving, to experience firsthand how their lessons helped create such a generous human being.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation was also floored that the "remarkable young man" would use his once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to give back. True to their mission, the organization fulfilled Abraham's wish. By September, with food and supplies donated from churches and local businesses, Abraham was able to help feed about 80 people in one day.

It's just so rewarding.

Phillies fan and boyfriend for you

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